Shurley English 101: Teaching with Confidence

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So, you have purchased your Shurley curriculum, you open the book or access your digital teacher’s manual…and then it hits you! “What’s all this? How am I going to cover all of it? Can I even do it?” If you have had these or similar feelings, don’t panic. It’s going to be all right.

My post today is about confidence. Yes! You can teach with confidence, especially if you are just embarking upon your first journey with Shurley English. I realize that the sheer volume of information about English that we teach might be enough to send you to the edge. But, pull back. Breathe. Help is on the way.

Narrow the Field: First, don’t view the entire bulk of the curriculum in preparation for your school year. Look at it in terms of only a school day…in other words, narrow the field. By nature, our brains can get way too overwhelmed by all the text you find in Shurley. Believe it or not, when I first started teaching this curriculum, I only needed to stay a day or two ahead of my students. Sure…preview the student objectives because they are a guideline for WHAT you will be teaching during a specific chapter and lesson. However, the crux of the teaching is found in the References. They are numbered for you, so simply read the teaching scripts and the References found in only the first lesson you plan to teach. Make any notes you might think will be handy when you start working with the materials and teaching the kids.

Pre-learn the Jingles: Next, make sure you know the jingles that accompany the lesson before you actually teach them. You will reflect confidence to your student if you already know each jingle well. Spend the first minutes of every session practicing the jingle with your learner(s). If you have our Jingle Posters, chunk the verses a bit to make them more bite-sized. With a marker, draw brackets around each section you want to rehearse. It’s easier to add on new verses of the same jingle over several lessons.

Pre-read the Scripts: As you move into the Question and Answer Flow, pre-read the scripts before actually teaching. Start slowly. You don’t even have to do all of the sentences required during the same lesson at the beginning of your school year. You and your student(s) will gain momentum quickly! (If you find that you would like to supplement your sentence work, you can check out our Sentence Booklets for extra practice.)

Pre-determine Words: Finally, to help build your confidence in the area of teaching writing, again, preview the Builder Sentence Blueprints that occur every so often in the program. The first time you introduce the concept, make sure you have pre-determined some of your own words you want to use for composing your sentence. That way, as you invite your learners to volunteer answers for the spaces on the grid, you have a pre-planned word to use if everyone gets stymied. You will appear to be completely in control and very confident during what might seem like an intimidating exercise. 

The bottom line rule for growing in your confidence is more about a balanced ratio of pre-reading to avoid surprises and following the script when it is provided! You will quickly gain the confidence you need by rehearsing your lessons beforehand in the ways I have outlined above. Good luck! And, don’t forget, you can always call our office and speak with any one of our expert customer service representatives. If you just need to talk, or if you want a boost of confidence, don’t go to silence. Call us at 800-566-2966.

Go forth and teach confidently!

The Art of Self-Care for Teachers: Saying "No."

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Last week, we discussed how practicing the art of self-care IS your duty.  Learning how to set boundaries at home and work helps you take care of YOU so you can take care of others. One valuable way to break your pattern of self-sacrifice is by learning how to gracefully say, “No.”

When you’re a chronic giver or helper, it’s really hard to tell people, “No.”  Most of us don’t like to disappoint people.  We avoid conflict when possible, and many people simply believe that taking care of one’s self is just plain selfish.  These days, more and more people have started shifting their beliefs around self-care; personal health and well-being have become a part of people’s lives in the 21st Century.  People are empowered when they can say, “No” to a request that is not absolutely necessary.

Please be aware of this important point:  When you begin to set boundaries and start saying, “NO,” people may seem disappointed.  Disappointment is a perception, and you’re NOT in charge of managing other people’s emotions.

To learn how to gracefully say, “No,” follow these three steps:

1. Buy Some Time

-Put space between the request and your answer. (Example:  “I’ll need to get back to you,” or “I’ll need to sleep on it.”)

-Let the person know that you may NOT be able to commit.  (Example:  “I’ve made the decision to limit the commitments I make, so I may not be able to do this.”)

2. Do a Gut-Check

-Take three deep breaths.

-Ask yourself, “On a scale from 1-10, how much do I really want to do this?”

-If you’re still unsure, ask yourself, “If I knew this person wouldn’t be angry, disappointed, or upset, would I say “No?”

 

3. Tell the Truth Directly…with Grace and Love

-BE HONEST about how you feel without over-explaining. (Example:  “I feel bad about letting you down, but I need to…”)

-Tell the truth directly in 1-2 concise lines.

-Ask how you can provide support. (Only do this when you have an ethical responsibility to someone or a situation, such as volunteering, promises, agreements, etc.)

 

When you set healthy boundaries at work and home, you will find that you’re happier, more productive, and feel more present in your life.  You will notice that your cup will feel fuller, and you will be more resilient in times of stress.  It’s vital for you to make a difference in your own life first, so you can make a difference in the lives of others.   Be an empowered educator in the 21st Century!

 

If you’d like to learn more about self-care, check out Cheryl Richardson’s book, The Art of Extreme Self-Care.

The Art of Self-Care for Teachers

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Are you familiar with the frog in boiling water metaphor?  (Of course, do not attempt this at home!)

Imagine a pot of cold water sitting on the burner of a stove. A frog is peacefully swimming in it. The heat is turned on, and the water starts warming up. The frog finds this pleasant and keeps swimming. The temperature keeps rising, though. Now, the water is a little more than what the frog enjoys; it becomes a bit tired, but it doesn’t panic. As the water continues to heat up, the frog finds it very uncomfortable, and it becomes weak. At this point, the frog withstands the heat as much as it can, but is unable to do anything. Sadly, you can probably imagine where this is going. The frog never tries to escape the pot and is consumed.

Next, imagine another frog being plunged into a pot of boiling water. The result is very different for this frog. The frog immediately gives a powerful push with its legs to get out of the boiling water. This frog survives and ends up being kissed by a princess…Oh, wait that’s a totally different story.

 

Seriously, do you ever feel like you’re the frog in either one of these scenarios?  You’re not alone if you answered, “Yes.”  I share this story with you to begin a conversation about self-care.  

Have you ever noticed that it is often easier to give than to receive?  Teachers are notorious for taking care of others before taking care of themselves.  For those of us labeled as “givers,” it feels good to be helpful.  There’s comfort and satisfaction knowing that we are needed in some way; so we keep giving.  When we become a chronic helper, by this I mean rarely or never saying, “No,” what we’re actually doing is sending a message to people that implies we will always be available.  So, we continue down this path (adapting to the warmer water) until we realize we’re exhausted, irritable, stressed-out, burned-out, or even ill.  This is the sign that should tell us that we’ve become the frog in the hot water; we’ve adapted to the discomfort that surrounds us, and now it’s too difficult to get out.

I know from personal experience that I have allowed people to push my boundaries, to the point of illness.  People in general, but specifically we teachers, are not as good at giving to ourselves and setting the necessary boundaries to keep us healthy and happy.  In the school setting, there are plenty of requests for your extra participation outside of your required educator duties.  I know… sometimes, it might even seem easier to teach when you’re sick than to create plans for a substitute teacher for a day or a week.  It’s also easier to keep the peace and sign up for one more non-mandatory committee than it is to say, “I’m unable to commit because I have enough on my plate at this time.” 

Practicing the art of self-care IS your duty.  Learning how to set boundaries at home and work helps you take care of YOU so you can take care of others.

 Stay tuned for my next blog; I’ll teach you how to stay resilient by gracefully saying, “No.”